Dambuster of the Day No. 61: Edward Johnson

Hobday Knight Johnson 23Jun43

L-R: Sidney Hobday, Les Knight and Edward (‘Johnny’) Johnson, outside Buckingham Palace in June 1943. [Pic:www.studiegroepluchtoorlog.nl] 

Flg Off E C Johnson
Bomb aimer

Lancaster serial number: ED912/G

Call sign: AJ-N

First wave. Third aircraft to attack Eder Dam. Mine dropped accurately causing final breach.

There were two bomb aimers called Johnson on the Dams Raid, something that occasionally causes confusion. A third bomb aimer was called Johnston. In the inevitable way of things in the wartime RAF, both Johnsons were also known to their friends and colleagues as ‘Johnny’. The older of the two was Edward Cuthbert Johnson, bomb aimer in Les Knight’s crew, who was born in Lincoln on 3 May 1912. When his father was killed on the Western Front in 1914, he and his mother moved to Gainsborough, although he was educated at Lincoln Grammar School.
On leaving school, he worked for Woolworths and then the catering firm, Lyons, and then in a boarding house business in Blackpool with his wife’s family.
He joined the RAF in 1940, qualified as an observer/bomb aimer in early 1942, and was commissioned. After further training he was posted briefly to 106 Squadron, but then sent back to a training unit to be crewed up with Les Knight and his colleagues. They moved to 50 Squadron in September 1942, and Johnson flew on some 22 operations with the Knight crew.
Johnson and Hobday were the elder statesmen of the Knight crew, both nine years older than their skipper, and senior to him in rank. But they worked well as a team, each obviously seeing in the younger man what an outstanding pilot he was. All three were decorated for their role in the Dams Raid, Knight getting the DSO and Johnson and Hobday the DFC, and were photographed together outside Buckingham Palace on the day of the investiture.
In September, on the fateful Dortmund Ems operation Johnson jumped from the stricken Lancaster when orderd to by Knight. He yelled: ‘Cheerio boys. Best of luck. See you in London.’ He recalled later: ‘The farewells were a little hasty but lacked nothing in sincerity for that.
Like four of his colleagues, Johnson successfully evaded capture and reached the safety of Spain, with the help of a friendly Dutch farmer and policeman, and various members of the resistance in Holland, Belgium and France. He returned to the UK, via Gibraltar.
He served out the rest of the war in various ground postings, and left the RAF in 1947.
He went back to Blackpool, and joined a company selling fireplaces, where he worked until his retirement.
Edward Johnson died on 1 October 2002.

More about Johnson online:
Obituary in the Daily Telegraph

Survived war. Died 1 October 2002.

Rank and decorations as of 16 May 1943.
Sources:
Richard Morris, Guy Gibson, Penguin 1995
John Sweetman, The Dambusters Raid, Cassell 2002
John Sweetman, David Coward and Gary Johnstone, The Dambusters, Time Warner 2003

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4 thoughts on “Dambuster of the Day No. 61: Edward Johnson

  1. Robbo January 10, 2014 / 10:25 am

    there are old and bold aircrew, he was very bold and reached a fine old age

  2. john hobday May 10, 2014 / 6:41 pm

    Hi Charles my name is John Sydney Hobday the eldest son of Sidney Hobday I was looking for a picture of dad as all my photos that he gave me were lost in a fire many years ago.I watched Johnny Johnson on the local news in the week as he must live close by and it reminded me to look for some photos on line never seen this one before it’s a nice picture of them all

    • Carole Green August 16, 2015 / 9:39 pm

      Hi John,
      My family are Hobdays, originally from Warwickshire. Gt grandad moved to lincoln before 1881. I wondered if there could be any connection between our families?

  3. Nigel Favill June 17, 2014 / 9:39 pm

    Hi Charles was Edward not ” Johnnie ” Johnson , spelt the same as AVM Johnson from fighter command .. 616 sqd ….. and ” Johnny ” was George Leonard Johnson 617 sqd

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